Books of da Week: Terry Pratchett’s Nome Trilogy

Terry Pratchett
A glorious front cover.

With the sad news the one and only Mr. Terry Pratchett passed away yesterday, we’re paying tribute to his somewhat forgotten novella trilogy. Most people will be going on about the Discworld series right now, but our favourite books of his have (and has) always been the Nome Trilogy.

Being a trilogy there are three books in this particular trilogy (duh!), and these are Truckers (1989), Diggers (1990), and Wings (1990). They tell the story of a bunch of nomes, tiny dudes hidden around the world in floorboards, out of the way of those bloody annoying human beings. Protagonists Masklin and Grimma are outsiders as they are part of a community lost in the wilderness, which is where we first meet them in Truckers. They’re kind of on their last legs and need to find salvation, so they make a brave decision. Cripes!

Terry Pratchett’s Nome Trilogy

The intrepid group make the leap into a shopping centre and discover a horde of Nomes who worship, and fear, the likes of the dreaded Prices Slashed (a security guard whom wanders the store at night), and Bargains Galore (a deity like figure). As the books progress, however, it becomes apparent the Nomes play a much bigger part in the world.

Central to all of this is the Thing (who is often inadvertently hilarious), a historical artifact the outsiders have carried around with them for generations. When it’s suddenly introduced to electricity it springs to life and begins disseminating weird information about the Nomes’ history. This triggers off a hunt for a better life, with the Nomes eager to escape from the shadow of human existence and find something which suits them.

As you’d expect from Mr. Pratchett, these books are very charming and crammed full of imagination. They’re perfect for children, teenagers, young adults, adults, old age pensioners, and humans in general. Everyone should read them, and you will enjoy the things almightily. We can’t think of a better tribute to a creative genius.

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