Charles Bukowski: Post Office (Moonshake Books)

Post Office
A bit of postal work, anyway?

Greetings, everybody! Today, we also published a big old book review over on our other blog, which should make up for no Book of da Week this week. So, like Bukowski? Like profanity? Want something to remind you your job isn’t as bad as you think? You’ll enjoy Post Office! Thanking you muchly – Mr. Wapojif xoxoxoxox

Moonshake Books

Right, my last three reviews have encompassed a lot of serious philosophising and whatnot. Charles Bukowski’s Post Office (1971) isn’t quite in the same league there, but what it does represent is a fine instalment in addiction, and down and out, literature, as well as something genuinely funny to read.

The former sprung forth through the likes of Thomas De Quincey in the 19th century, who candidly discussed his addiction to opium. The latter, down and out literature, I first came across when I read several of George Orwell’s works, which dealt with poverty and social and economic injustice – a sad situation which hasn’t advanced a great deal since Orwell’s day.

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7 comments

        • If you check my Ham on Rye or Women posts (two of his other books) I go into my theories there in detail. Basically, he had terrible acne (and I mean horrific – it’s very sad) as a teenager and was also not the best looking chap ever, so he was, essentially, alienated from his generation and was left as a loner. He ended up being a bit of a misanthrope as a result.

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            • Yeah, I think I’ve seen some of those clips from the 2003 documentary film about him. As soon as he became famous, a lot of women began queuing up for him. I wouldn’t do that myself, not being a woman and all, but I’d go for Kerouac’s charms I think. Bukowski would more be a pat on the back type buddy.

              Jim Morrison was a poet, of course. I wonder why women were interested in him? Can’t see it, myself… despite the brooding good looks, talent, fame, wealth, being in a rock band etc. I don’t get it. It is confusing.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Jim Morrision was basically a slob, I don’t feel he had an abundance of talent but his music fit the upheaval of the time. I definitely prefer Kerouac, a true adventurer with a jest for life.

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