Onegai Monster: Bottom Up’s Obscure N64 Romp

Onegai Monsters on the N64
Huzzah!

Huzzah! It’s another surreal Nintendo 64 title from legendary oddball Japanese developer Bottom Up. And it riffs off Pokémon big time, as well as remaining one of the console’s most obscure titles.

Onegai Monster

Right, so this is a rather forgotten strategy game for the Nintendo 64. As this was a Japanese release only, us westerners didn’t get to enjoy its weirdness.

Although it gets the Pokémon clone dubbing, Onegai Monster (おねがいモンスター) is actually much more similar to the likes of Digimon World.

It launched in April of 1999, well into the console’s lifespan. It clearly wasn’t a big hit of any type, as there’s barely any information about the game online.

And it’s, really, pretty much the most obscure and forgotten Nintendo 64 game we think we’ve ever come across.

In terms of gameplay, it’s a monster collecting type of game. So, its sort of a Pokémon clone with the whole Digimon World (also 1999) thing going on.

Onegai means “please” in Japan, so the title is actually Please Monster. Which makes little sense, but there we go.

That’s why we love Bottom Up. The developer was responsible for other obscure Nintendo 64 games such as 64 Trump Collection. And we have a fondness for its wacky premises.

For the sake of this review we actually played Onegai Monster online on an emulation site thing. And, yeah, along with the impenetrable Japanese, there’s the kawaii culture stuff going on.

The graphical style is quite good for the time and the music is upbeat.

And yeah, it’s very much a game of its time—plus, it’s so very, very quirky Japanese. Bottom Up style.

Due to the baffling nature of the language for us, we couldn’t really get very far. But we did want to document what’s something of a forgotten Nintendo 64 game.

It didn’t take off in the way Pokémon did, but it’s entered a realm of obscurity that just happens to appeal to lunatics like ourselves.

Have some gibberish to dispense with?

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