Salad Cream: The Underdog Condiment That’s Good With Veg

Heinz Salad Cream
You what, mate?!

In the world of British condiments, ketchup and HP sauce dominate proceedings. However, salad cream is the plucky underdog.

For decades it’s remained a steadfast contributor to British foodstuffs. And, gosh darn it, does that not fill us up with nationalistic mania!? Yes. It does.

What’s Salad Cream?

It’s a pale yellow condiment consisting of oil in water, egg yolk, and spirit vinegar.

It’ll often have sugar, mustard, salt, and flavourings added to that heady mix of saucy excellence.

And, yes, typically you’re going to use this thing with salads. But many fans go the extra mile and chuck it onto their burgers or some such.

In modern Britain, the condiment is thought of as the underdog sauce. For sure.

Ketchup and HP “brown” sauce dominate proceedings at pubs and restaurants, but there’s a steady enough fan base for salad cream.

In fact, back in 2013 it shifted some 40 million bottles! But it remains one of those condiments you chuck in with the other socially acceptable ones, kind of in the way some folks add a solitary vegan option to a menu to placate the minority.

It’s one of those things we shouldn’t really be so excited about, but it does generate a fair bit of conversation about things over a rustic pub dinner.

Taste wise? Well, it’s sort of like mayonnaise. But with a tangy, sweet taste. Good, eh?

What’s the History of Salad Cream?

A recipe for English salad sauce turned up in Modern Cookery For Private Families (1845) by Eliza Action.

Similarly, a “salad cream” was included in Mrs. Beeton’s Book of Household Management (1861).

As you can see, the foundations for this glorious sauce were laid down during the 19th century. But it wasn’t until the 20th century when it took off proper!

US business Heinz developed the recipe over eight years, with the recipe aimed specifically at the British public.

It went live in 1914 from a West London production factory in Harlesden. 180 jars were completed daily and sent off to shops in straw-lined barrels.

Since then, salad cream has become the condiment British people love to barely acknowledge.

We’ve even seen one website class it as “disturbingly gelatinous”, as if the likes of ketchup and Worcestershire sauce are A okay and not at all equally unusual.

However, salad cream simply doesn’t have the same storied history as many other iconic British recipes.

It’s not going to cause any riots in the streets if it stops production, basically, but has a fond following who seem happy to acknowledge its existence.

How Do You Make a Salad?

Dreamboat Jamie Oliver is on hand with tips on how to improve your salad game.

One of our tricks with any salad is to add a lovely bunch of fresh stuff to a bowl. Chuck over a little olive oil and black pepper, then chuck in some shredded cheese.

Toss that lot together and you have a pretty decent little number going.

If you’ve got fussy eater kids refusing their veggies, lay that one on them and COMMAND them to eat the green goodness.

How Do You Make Salad Cream?

You can have a go at making this stuff yourself if you fancy! All you need are the following ingredients:

Double cream
Sugar
Hard boiled egg yolks
Mustard
Lemon juice
Vinegar

You can also add cayenne pepper if you want some oomph!

Cobble that lot together and you’ve got yourself something to hurl onto your salad. Sorted, eh? Indeed.

7 comments

  1. Jamie stole my salad recipe!!!!
    I need to punish him but rubbing my homemade salad dressing (he stole that from me too) all over his bod!
    That should teach him!

    Like

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